Tony Jackson Case for Motivation

In: Business and Management

Submitted By PKay77
Words 1407
Pages 6
CASE STUDY

Tony Jackson was first employed in a busy branch office of a building society on a Youth
Training Scheme but left after two years because there was no permanent position available at that time. However, nine months later and following a period on continual rapid growth in business a new position was established in the branch. Jackson applied and got the job. After speaking on the telephone to the personnel department at head office, Mary Rogers the branch manager told her staff that she had always got on well with Tony Jackson. He seemed very bright, did everything asked of him and never caused her any trouble

Jane Taylor had been employed with the branch for the past four years, since leaving sixth form college. Her main duties were those of a cashier and assisting with mortgage advance accounts.
Two weeks before Jackson was due to start work Mary Rogers asked to see her. ‘From now on,
Jane, I would like you to ast as senior branch assistant. I need someone to take some of the weight off my shoulders. Your main task will be to be responsible for the quality and accuracy of the work of the staff and to look after things when I’m not here.’

‘Well...er...thank you, Miss Rogers. This is unexpected. It sounds exciting, but I wonder if...’
‘Oh, I know you can manage, Jane,’ continued Mary Rogers. ‘You know I tend to rely on you already. Anyway I’ve arranged for you to attend a refresher course at head office the week after next. It’s all about our systems and procedures, and new ideas on automated technology, I think

they call it. I am sure you will cope. And I know the extra money for the job will be helpful, won’t it?
‘Yes, that’s true enough - the money will certainly be helpful - but...’
‘Good, that’s fine then. I’m glad we got that settled. Now you must excuse me,’ said Mary
Rogers standing up. ‘I have to attend to these…...

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