To What Extent Have Socialists Disagreed About the Means of Achieving Socialism?

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To what extent have socialists disagreed about the means of achieving socialism?

Socialism along with many other ideologies has a vast number of different strands and with a couple of different roads to achieving what is fundamentally socialism. Socialism being the ideology that utilises collectivisation to bring people together and to unite people by their common humanity. The two most obvious roads of socialism would be that of revolutionary socialism and also that of evolutionary socialism. This are taken on by two different types of socialists, revisionist socialists and fundamentalist socialists. Revolutionary socialism is the belief that capitalism can only be overthrown by revolution against the current political system. To them this would inevitably involve the use of violence as a means to achieve what they wish. Evolutionary socialism involves the belief that evolution would lead to socialism as the times had changed and revolution was no longer as fresh in people’s minds and the alternative was that there was an alternative that would benefit the proletariat more. Both roads of socialism agree on one thing fundamentally, this is the fact that socialism is inevitable no matter what route is taken to get there. Evolutionary socialists believe that socialism is inevitable as it will slowly adapt over time due to the change in economics and living conditions which will eventually lead to socialism emerging as the most practical outcome. Revolutionary socialists also believe that it is inevitable as there will be a sudden revolt as a result of the ever worsening oppression of the proletariat. They think that this is inevitable because the free market system that liberals believe in is undeniably exploitative and private property leads people to take advantage over other people for personal gains. This also leads to another disagreement which is the levels…...

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