To What Extent Did British Society Change 1955-75?

In: Historical Events

Submitted By dubai1996
Words 380
Pages 2
The 20 years between 1955 and 1975 were a dramatic time of change in British society. Hundreds of new laws and legislation were introduced during this time as part of the ‘Liberalisation of Society’, in which the government aimed to provide for the general public and fill the gaps that were left by the changing attitudes and views of society as a whole. One section of society that was greatly affected by change during this period was the general family life, which saw lots of change; however, it is still argued that many aspects still remained the same.

One aspect of family life that saw much change was the traditional view of the family and roles within the home. This was largely due to the changing attitudes towards women and whether they should be at home looking after the children and doing house chores or working and earning their own money. The traditional pathway for a woman was that they would leave school at the minimum age, 15, get married and dedicate their time to being a housewife. However, the end of the Second World War saw many women going out to work and a large feminist movement fought for equal pay and legislation against any forms of sex discrimination within employment; this brought out a new view of women and their roles within the family, in some families, men were no longer the only providers in the family and childcare and domestic work were starting to be shared out, this is suggested in an online article which explains that ‘there was now much more variety and change in the way people in Great Britain moved into and out of families’. Although there were still very few women working, housewives were beginning to gain more independence in their lives, despite them not working. The Married Women’s Property act of 1964 now put value on women as housewives, along side this, the National Security act ensured that everyone was now entitled to a…...

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