The Physics of High Jump

In: Science

Submitted By henderaw
Words 1402
Pages 6
The Physics of High Jump Physics is the most important aspect of every sport that people play today. One sport that is completely physics based is track and field, but more specifically, the event known as the high jump. High jump has been around since the 19th century, with the first jump simply a standing high jump. Over the past one hundred years the technique of high jump has evolved to include: the scissor kick, the western roll, and eventually the fosbury flop; which is currently used today. With each new technique came higher results. I have been high jumping since junior high and for the past six years I’ve learned the ins and outs of what it takes to achieve a successful jump. I currently jump for the University of Tennessee and my knowledge of the event has since increased. The specific technique that I will talk about is known as the fosbury flop, or simply known as the flop. High jump can be broken down into three stages: the run up phase or approach, the takeoff phase, and the flight or bar clearance phase. By understanding these three stages and the different laws of physics that make them up, one will have a much greater understanding of the most exciting event in track and field. The first part of high jump is the approach or the run up. The most important parts of the run up are the J-curve and the speed. It is important to maximize the amount of speed that a runner brings to the bar; therefor the approach is run along a curve in the shape of a J. As the jumper begins his approach, he should start in a bounding motion, pulling the foot heel-to-toe as he pulls the ground. This produces a higher amount of static friction that keeps the foot from sliding on the ground (Weiner). This also allows the jumper to build up his speed through the J curve. The next part of the approach, and most important, is the J curve. By running alongside a curve, the…...

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