The Medicated Child

In: Social Issues

Submitted By annaosteen
Words 727
Pages 3
Frontline: Medicated Child

In the 2008 Frontline documentary “The Medicated Child” Should children with ADHD, ADD or BIPOLAR be medicated? The film was focused on four families with children that presented abnormal symptoms of behavior and the over prescribed prescription of medication these children were receiving. Although many parents, doctors and teacher would say yes to medicating their children, I believe there are far too many risks for children with ADHD, ADD or BIPOLAR to be medicated and to medicate is merely a matter of a doctor option. Parent’s first option was medication and as one parent stated “not one of the doctors suggested an alternative to the medications.” (Frontline, 2001)
ADHD, ADD or BIPOLAR medication have damaging mental and physical side effects include: psychosis, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, aggressive behavior, depression and social withdrawal. The physical side effects of these medications are tics, nausea, weight loss or gain and possible liver damage. Dr. Biederman along with his colleagues published their findings, there has been a 4,000 percent increased in the number of children being diagnosed with bipolar.
One of the four children in the documentary the father of DJ Koontz stated “the family does not know long term effects.” DJ’s child psychiatrist Dr. Patrick Bacon believes he’s bipolar, but there’s no definitive test for any psychiatric illness. The parents were interview in the film, they explain their difficult situation. They are not enthusiastic about the medication, but they don’t see any alternative because of DJ’s rages last have a day, and his self-harming behavior. As child psychiatrist Dr. Patrick Bacon states in the film. “It’s really to some extent an experiment, trying medications in these children of this age.” One of the medications DJ’s taking is Risperdal the side effects are tics, drooling, excessive…...

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