Stoicism

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Submitted By gerard84
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Stoicism Stoicism is a philosophical teaching which has proven itself the most attainable and practicable ideology for the general citizen, baring ethics as its fruit. Stoics explain the world through physics, logic, and ethics. They draw attention to ethics and develop it as their primary importance of reason, while expanding on logic and physics as substance to strut their ethical resolves and principles. Originating from Greece, Stoicism evolved during the course of multiple periods, its inconsistencies being refined in the Roman hands and eventually popularized through Christianity with a slight, yet important modification (AOK 196, 224).
Stoicism arose from Antisthenes’ Cynicism, using its foundation that the main personal pursuit was happiness was within the soul and that one had to use “rational control of all desires and appetites” (AOK 194). The Cynics, greatly influenced by Socrates’ lifestyle, had disdain for civilization for it weakened and corrupted the soul. They eventually turned away from everyone, becoming individualistic instead of brotherly. Their attention to happiness, or averting of unhappiness, was solely personal and showed their mistake of establishing their ideology on a “savage and uncultured nature,” instead of “a developed civilized nature” as the Stoic have (TSC 184) However, Cynicism had taught Diogenes who became the living icon of the cynical ideology “the less an individual needs to be happy, the less vulnerable he or she is,” becoming a moral hero along Socrates (AOK 113).
Through an amalgam of Socratic virtue, Heraclitus’ fire, Aristotle’s logic, and Cynicism, Zeno founded early Stoicism in Athens. Specific to the Stoics was their emphasis on living in unity with nature, and that something which is good is necessarily good for its bearer at all times (SEP 3). Nature can be discerned into two categories, nature as a whole and…...

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