Security of the Human Rights Defenders in Protecting Human Rights in Bangladesh

In: People

Submitted By talukderlaw
Words 3969
Pages 16
Security of the Human Rights Defenders in Protecting Human Rights in Bangladesh
Security of the Human Rights Defenders in Protecting Human Rights in Bangladesh
-Justice A. K. Badrul Huq
Human Rights are Charter of Rights for Mankind. Human Rights are those Rights which are inherent in the nature of Human Beings without which Human Beings cannot live in the World. Concept of Human Right is not a new one but ancient. From the earliest time, human history is a history of long struggle to protect human rights, liberty and independence. Scholars like Plato and Aristotle championed thought that People/Men were not subject who are exclusively made to bow but, also were Human Beings who needed to be taken care of. History witnesses that powerful Emperor/Rajas by dint of their power and superiority conquered another weak state/ country and Land and Independent citizens of conquered/vanquished state/ country were taken to the Land of Conquerors and their Liberty and Independence were seized, thus grossly violating their Human Rights to live in their state/ country/Land as free and Independent citizens. citizens of the conquered country were taken to the Land Conquerors as slaves. We speak of Roman Civilization. But the question is- By dint of sheer power and arms did Romans not violate Human Rights of free and Independent citizens of another weak and powerless countries. In the face of Human Right violation can Romans be characterized as Civilized? My answer is in firm Negative.
British people/Englishmen kept the people of this sub-continent under their feet for long two hundred Years by dint of conspiracy, intrigues, with the help of some traitors/betrayers of the soil of Bengal. British people came to this sub-continent only to rule the sub-continent, not that with a Missionary object to educate people and to help people in building of up society. But they came only to…...

Similar Documents

Human Rights

... Human Rights “The Essence of Constitutional Governance“ “Problems can be solved by the same level of thinking that created them.” Introduction * Human: (noun) A member of the Homo sapiens species; a man, woman or child; a person. * Rights: (noun) Things to which you are entitled or allowed; freedoms that are guaranteed. * Human Rights: (noun) The rights you have simply because you are human. * Human rights are commonly understood as "inalienable fundamental rights to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being.” Human rights are thus conceived as universal (applicable everywhere) and egalitarian (the same for everyone). These rights may exist as natural rights or as legal rights, in both national and international law. The doctrine of human rights in international practice, within international law, global and regional institutions, in the policies of states and in the activities of non-governmental organizations, has been a cornerstone of public policy around the world. * Every person has dignity and value. One of the ways that we recognize this fundamental worth is by acknowledging and respecting a person’s human rights. * Human rights are concerned with equality and fairness. They recognize our freedom to make choices about our life and develop our potential as human beings. They are......

Words: 2754 - Pages: 12

Human Rights

...Human Rights Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible. Human rights are inalienable. They should not be taken away, except in specific situations and according to due process. For example, the right to liberty may be restricted if a person is found guilty of a crime by a court of law. Many people know something about their rights. Generally they know they have the right to food and a safe place to stay. They know they have a right to be paid for the work they do. But there are many other rights. When human rights are not well known by people, abuses such as discrimination, intolerance, injustice, oppression and slavery can arise  Human rights entail both rights and obligations. States assume obligations and duties under international law to respect, to protect and to fulfill human rights. The obligation to respect means that States must refrain from interfering with or curtailing the enjoyment of human rights. There also exist Universal Human Rights as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and...

Words: 2284 - Pages: 10

Human Rights

...Success of Human Rights Act Beth Kemunto Institutional Affiliations Table of content Introduction Bringing the rights home Incompatibility declarations Success through HRA Conclusion Bibliography Success of Human Rights Act Abstract This paper tries to vivify the sufficiency with which Human Rights Acts 1998 protects the UK citizens. The paper considers the incompatibility declaration which is a major hindrance to the Human Rights Acts based on Belmarish Detention case. In spite of this limitation, the overall reports and recommendations forwarded on Human Rights Act, it’s vivid that the UK residents are protected by the rights. Introduction After its enactment into UK law on 2nd October 2000, the Human Rights Act 1998 has also incorporated other European Convention Human Rights (ECHR). It is therefore very important to validate the success of the Human Rights Act in the previous decade. This paper thus focuses on the objectives of the HRA to assess the extent of success to which it offers to the UK residents. This essay will focus on the analysis of the case of A and others versus the secretary of State for Home Department (2004) in order to validate the caveat of the declaration of incompatibility. In this case, it is evident that challenge has been poised on the effectiveness of HRA upholding rights as quite fundamental. However, the success of HRA posits concrete evidence that HRA does not protect the rights of UK......

Words: 1232 - Pages: 5

Human Rights

...Inalienability: Human rights are universal and inalienable. All people everywhere in the world are entitled to them. The universality of human rights is encompassed in the words of Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” Everyone is born with and possesses the same rights, regardless of where they live, their gender or race, or their religious, cultural or ethnic background. Inalienable: because people’s rights can never be taken away except in specific situations and according to due process. For example, the right to liberty may be restricted if a person is found guilty of a crime by a court of law. Indivisibility: Human rights are indivisible. Whether they relate to civil, cultural, economic, political or social issues, human rights are inherent to the dignity of every human person. Consequently, all human rights have equal status, and cannot be positioned in a hierarchical order. Denial of one right invariably impedes enjoyment of other rights. Thus, the right of everyone to an adequate standard of living cannot be compromised at the expense of other rights, such as the right to health or the right to education. First-generation human rights, often called "blue" rights, deal essentially with liberty and participation in political life. They are fundamentally civil and political in nature: They serve negatively to protect the individual from excesses of the state. First-generation......

Words: 1717 - Pages: 7

Human Rights

...google.com.mx about what are the human rights, I finally found a website (http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Pages/WhatareHumanRights.aspx) where it defines the term and also describes some of the main ideas of what involves human rights. Then, went back to www.google.com and searched information about the human rights to the health care and found the website http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs323/en/ that is the same as OMS, but in English. What are human rights? Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible. Universal human rights are often expressed and guaranteed by law, in the forms of treaties, customary international law, general principles and other sources of international law. International human rights law lays down obligations of Governments to act in certain ways or to refrain from certain acts, in order to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms of individuals or groups. Universal and inalienable the principle of universality of human rights is the cornerstone of international human rights law. This principle, as first emphasized in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights in 1948, has been reiterated in numerous international human rights conventions,......

Words: 1657 - Pages: 7

Human Rights

...Human rights Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible. Article 2: Right to Life 1. Everyone's right to life shall be protected by law. No one shall be deprived of his life intentionally save in the execution of a sentence of a court following his conviction of a crime for which this penalty is provided for by law.  As well as prohibiting the state from taking your life, Article 2 also requires the state to protect your right to life by having in place proper and adequate criminal sanctions to punish those who take your life intentionally. Failure by the state to properly investigate a suspected murder, or to prosecute the suspected murderer, may amount to a breach of the right to life of the victim.  In certain limited cases, Article 2 may impose a duty on the state to take positive steps to protect your life where it is being threatened. So where there is an environmental hazard that poses a very high risk to the life of the people living nearby, the state may have a duty to provide information about that hazard to enable the people to take steps to protect themselves and their families. In the case of Osman v UK, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) found......

Words: 1967 - Pages: 8

Human Security and Human Rights

...era of globalization. New actors, new events, new issues being securitized and new approaches of international relations, particularly of International Security Studies came out in this period. With this set of new affairs, the concepts of Human Security and Human Rights gained relevance in the international security and international norms field. And because those terms are still contested among both the academics and the States’ decision-makers, there is a need for us to understand what they really mean. The purpose of the present essay is to bring forward the differences between Human Security and Human Rights, regarding the fact that they are very similar and complementary, and also to understand the implications that the emphasis in the concept of Human Security have for the States foreign policy and for the international order and justice. The essay is composed by an introduction, a main body where we develop the answers for the research questions, a conclusion and finally the references. 2. The Prominence of the Concept Human Rights in International Relations 3.1. Human Security different from Human Rights? Despite the fact that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted in 1948, due the debate raised because of the Holocaust, the WWII and many others factors, it is known that Human Rights gained more emphasis in the post-Cold War period, when the emergence of new wars (no longer conflicts between nation-states, but intra-state......

Words: 1597 - Pages: 7

Human Rights

...HUMAN RIGHTS Questions and Answers LEAH LEVIN Illustrated by Plantu NATIONAL BOOK TRUST, INDIA in collaboration with UNESCO Publishing The first edition of Human Rights: Questions and Answers was published by UNESCO in 1981 and translated into many languages. It was then substantially redrafted and updated by taking into account recent developments in the field of human .rights. This Indian edition, like the new UNESCO publication, provides basic information on major human rights instruments, procedures for their implementation and activities of international organizations in order to promote and protect human rights. The publication represents a contribution to the realization of the Plan of Action for the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004). The book is published in the hope that it will be useful to students and teachers and to all those who are involved or interested in the promotion and protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms. Preface The history of mankind is marked by efforts to ensure respect for the dignity of human beings. The concept of human rights was introduced and developed by thinkers from various cultural and religious traditions. An important contribution to the promotion of this idea was made by statesmen and lawyers and written norms establishing protection of the rights of individuals were gradually inscribed in national laws. Steps were also taken to establish international human rights standards, in particular in......

Words: 31663 - Pages: 127

Human Rights

...One indicator of Human Development is freedom of choice or range of choices among the individuals 1. Introduction Freedom of choice[1] is right to exercise one's freedoms in any manner one may choose except where such act may obstruct or prevent others from exercising their freedoms, put oneself or others in danger, or exceeds a statutory limit. According to online Black’s law dictionary[2], Unfettered right to do what one wants when one wants as one wants, except where it infringes or prevents another from doing what that one wants, and do so on. Also excluded is doing something that would harm one’s self or another. Human development is a concept within the scope of the study of the human condition, specifically international development, relating to international and economic development. This concept of a broader human development was first laid out by Amartya Sen, a 1998 Nobel laureate, and expanded upon by Martha Nussbaum, Sabina Alkire, Ingrid Robeyns, and others (UNDP, 2012). Human development encompasses more than just the rise or fall of national incomes. Development is thus about expanding the choices people have, to lead lives that they value, and improving the human condition so that people have the chance to lead full lives (Streeten, 1994). Thus, human development is about much more than economic growth, which is only a means of enlarging people’s choices (UNDP, 2012). As a general definition, indicators are “tools for providing specific......

Words: 3480 - Pages: 14

Human Rights

...1. Universalism, Communitarian and Marxist perspectives all played a role in the development of human rights on a global scale. Basically, universalism argues that every human, is entitled to the same basic human rights - their gender, nor the religion they practice, nor the colour of their skin has any sort of impact on whether or not they have these rights. According to the course textbook, “universalism… comprises the right to physical security, integrity, freedoms of expression and association, the right to hold and sell private property,” (85). Universalism has strong ties with politics, in particular, liberal and democratic practices; that being said, the concepts of universalism revolve around political rights for the individual with the main focus remaining human rights. On the opposition, Communitarians do not believe the views of largely liberal intellectuals. One of their biggest criticisms is against the evolution and development of modern civilization; it is thought that the emergence of these civilizations forced individuals to become violent and almost barbaric, (96). It is also strongly believed by communitarians that basic human rights, including those listed above are not at all fundamental or inherent in all human beings. Furthermore, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the man credited for many communitarian theories, argued strongly against the notion of human rights defended people from other people and their actions, (97). There are some aspects, or some liberal...

Words: 842 - Pages: 4

Human Rights

...Human Wrongs, Human Rights Foreword The third edition of Human Wrongs, Human Rights, published jointly by British Irish RIGHTS WATCH and the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, is very welcome. This completely updated guide will help NGOs, lawyers and individuals to find their way around the various human rights mechanisms of the United Nations. The mechanisms can seem complex to those who are not familiar with them but, as this guide shows, they are in fact accessible and simple to use. Although primarily aimed at readers in Britain and Ireland, much of the information and the insights contained in the guide will be useful to people in many countries around the world. I congratulate British Irish RIGHTS WATCH and the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission for continuing to publish this useful guide and I encourage anyone whose human rights have been violated, or who is helping victims of such violations, to make imaginative use of the mechanisms the United Nations offers. Mary Robinson High Commissioner for Human Rights United Nations Geneva September 2001 Acknowledgements Special thanks to the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mary Robinson, for contributing a foreword to this guide, and to Mel James for her contribution towards the chapter on resolutions. Thanks also to the following staff at the United Nations: Affaf Abbass, Daniel Atchebro, Martine Anstett, Jean-Nicolas Beuze, Fiona Blyth-Kubota, Alessio Bruni, Jane Connors, Mac......

Words: 766 - Pages: 4

Human Rights

...CV0C=Universality of human rights has always been a extensively challenged and debated topic, especially in the recent decades. In recent decades, a widely contested debate over the universality of human rights has emerged.  Rights are certainly not universally-applied today, with oppression, torture and various atrocities committed in many parts of the world. This paper will focus on the notion that both in the Third-World and the West, states have used human rights discussion as a political tool, which has weakened arguments for its universality. This perspective will be utilised to break down arguments made against universal human rights before presenting alternative conceptions of universal human rights and identifying developments which may ensure they can be universally applied and respected. It is important to first define the theoretical basis of ‘universal’ human rights. Universal conceptions argue human rights are inalienable, self-evident and applicable to all human beings (Donnelly, 2003, 10). These arguments are often linked to origins in Western philosophy and natural law, developed from philosophers such as John Locke (Langlois, 2009, 12). Many scholars maintain that human rights are ‘pre-political’, thus unchangeable and unaffected by cultural or political variation. Donnelly identifies the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the basis in establishing the “contemporary consensus on internationally recognised human rights” (2003, 22). Human rights hold......

Words: 2646 - Pages: 11

Human Rights

...David Vega Instructor’s Name Class Information April 7, 2014 Human Rights in the 1920’s “Human Rights” refer to the basic rights and freedoms that all humans are entitled to including the right to life, equality before the law and freedom of expression. Human rights provide equality and fairness and recognize the people’s choice of freedom. Every human has the right to live free from fear, harassment or discrimination. During the 1920’s women’s rights, immigration, and racism were the biggest topics in human rights. Women’s rights were paramount in the 1920’s. The 19th Amendment was passed by Congress on June 4, 1919 and ratified on August 18, 1920. The 19th amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote. This was a lengthy and difficult struggle that took activists and reformers nearly 100 years to win. Some of the key leaders of this movement were Elizabeth Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Susan B. Anthony. These three women, along with the assistance of many others, were pivotal in shifting the public’s view on a women’s right to vote and be contributing members of the nation. During the nineteenth century, women organized, petitioned, lectured, marched, rioted, and practiced civil disobedience in order to get freedom. Since the 19th Amendment was first introduced in 1878 and not ratified until August 19, 1920, most of the woman who started the movement didn’t live to see it passed. After the passing of the...

Words: 1475 - Pages: 6

Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights

...From Compliance to Practice Mining Companies and the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights in the Democratic Republic of Congo Tanja A. Börzel/Jana Hönke SFB-Governance Working Paper Series 25 • October 2011 DFG Sonderforschungsbereich 700 Governance in Räumen begrenzter Staatlichkeit - Neue Formen des Regierens? DFG Research Center (SFB) 700 Governance in Areas of Limited Statehood - New Modes of Governance? SFB-Governance Working Paper Series Edited by the Research Center (SFB) 700 „Governance In Areas of Limited Statehood - New Modes of Governance?“ The SFB-Governance Working Paper Series serves to disseminate the research results of work in progress prior to publication to encourage the exchange of ideas and academic debate. Inclusion of a paper in the Working Paper Series should not limit publication in any other venue. Copyright remains with the authors. Copyright for this issue: Tanja A. Börzel/Jana Hönke Editorial assistance and production: Tanja Kilper/Sara Gebh/Anna Jüschke All SFB-Governance Working Papers can be downloaded free of charge from our website www.sfb-governance.de/en/ publikationen or ordered in print via e-mail to sfb700@zedat.fu-berlin.de. Börzel, Tanja A./ Hönke, Jana 2011: From Compliance to Practice. Mining Companies and the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights in the Democratic Republic of Congo, SFB-Governance Working Paper Series, No. 25, Research Center (SFB) 700, Berlin, October 2011. ISSN 1864-1024......

Words: 16584 - Pages: 67

Human Rights

...The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a declaration adopted by the United Nations General Assembly (10 December 1948 at Palais de Chaillot, Paris). The Declaration arose directly from the experience of the Second World War and represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It consists of 30 articles which have been elaborated in subsequent international treaties, regional human rights instruments, national constitutions and laws. The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols. In 1966 the General Assembly adopted the two detailed Covenants, which complete the International Bill of Human Rights; and in 1976, after the Covenants had been ratified by a sufficient number of individual nations, the Bill took on the force of international law.[1] Article 1 All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood. Article 2 Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction...

Words: 1613 - Pages: 7