Scientific Revolution and Women

In: Social Issues

Submitted By brooklynway
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Pages 4
Essay#1 Scientific revolution was a movement that took place in Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It marks a decisive break between the middle ages and the modern world. During this historical time, many scientific methods were discovered. Among them are mathematics, physics, astronomy, biology, medicine and chemistry. Along with these methods, tools such as microscope, thermometer, sextant and slide rule were invented to be used for scientific research. Talented people from around the world during this time period used their knowledge to come up with these scientific methods and utilized them to answer many other questions. Some of their findings are known as formulas. Today’s generation use these formulas as theories and tries to develop them to solve problems. Observation, experiment and invention existed as early as middle ages but in the mid-15th century the belief about the physical universe was questioned. Curiosity among talented people around the world intensified. This ultimately led to development of science. In 1543, Nicolaus Copernicus published the Revolution of the Heavenly Spheres. His model of the Universe was alternative to Claudius Ptolemy’s geocentric system which was widely accepted since ancient times. It is believed that Copernicus’s theory of Revolution of the Heavenly Spheres lit the torch in scientific revolution. In 1576, Tycho Brahe set up Uranilborgh observatory. It was a huge step in astronomy. The mystery of the physical universe had begun to reveal. Soon after, Johannes Kepler in 1609 followed up with the Astronomia Nova which included his decade long research of the motion of mars. Galileo Galilei published Starry Messenger in 1610 which was a method of observing our galaxy with a telescope. In 1610, Francis Bacon published introduced the new instruments of science. Finally, Sir Isaac Newton, a…...

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