Science Experiment

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Submitted By kell23n
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Science and Health V
Third Quarter Experiment 1
Name: ___________________________________________________________ Score:________
Section: SRP / SCR / STA Date: July 3, 2013 I. Objectives: To discover how essential the functions of roots and stems are to plant growth – See more

II. Materials: any white flower, scissors, water, plastic cup , Food coloring (red, blue, violet, and green) III. Procedure: 1. Fill four of the cups one-half full with water. 2. Add about 20-30 drops of food coloring to the cup of water (red, blue, and green). In this case, more food coloring is better. 3. Before placing any of the flowers in the cups of water, have an adult trim the stem of each flower at an angle to create a fresh cut. For cut flowers, it is important for the stem tubes to be filled with water. If air gets in the tube no water can move up the stem. 4. Place one freshly cut white carnation in the cup containing the uncolored water. 5. Leave it for 6-7 hours. 6. Then examine the whole plant carefully including the stems, leaves, buds, and petals.

7. Question:

1. What happens when you put flower in a colored water for several hours?
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
2. Why do girls menstruate?
_______________________________________________________________________________
3. How do roots and stem help the plants? 4. What is the characteristic of the root of the roots and stems that help to carry out its function
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Do not Write Here….. Category | 5 | 3 | 1 | | Participation | Used time pretty well. Stayed focused on the experiment all the time | Did the activity but did not appear…...

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