Principles of Management Applied Research Air Force Life Cycle Management Center (Aflcmc)

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PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT APPLIED RESEARCH
AIR FORCE LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT CENTER (AFLCMC)

Park University Internet Campus

A course paper presented to the School for Arts, Sciences, and Distance Learning

in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

Baccalaureate
Principles of Management
Park University
July 2015

This paper or presentation is my own work. Any assistance I received in its preparation is acknowledged within the paper or presentation, in accordance with Park University academic honesty policies. If I used data, ideas, words, diagrams, pictures, or other information from any source, I have cited the sources fully and completely in a citation within the paper and listed on the reference page. This includes sources which I have quoted or that I have paraphrased. Furthermore, I certify that this paper or presentation was prepared by me specifically for this class and has not been submitted, in whole or in part, to any other class in this University or elsewhere, or used for any purpose other than satisfying the requirements of this class, except that I am allowed to submit the paper or presentation to a professional publication, peer reviewed journal, or professional conference. This is not a draft, and is submitted for grading to satisfy in part the requirements for this course and the program(s) in which I am enrolled. In typing my name following the word 'Signature', I intend that this certification will have the same authority and authenticity as a document executed with my hand-written signature.

Type Signature:
TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

INTRODUCTION 3

BODY 4

Diversity Management 4

Ethical, Social, and Legal…...

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