Nasa Curiosity Mission

In: Science

Submitted By freshboi
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The topic of Mars has long been of interest to astronomers and science fiction enthusiast alike. The premise of another planet supporting life excites people like no other. In 2004, The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or NASA, began preliminary science experiments and instrument proposals for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and a robotic space probe mission to Mars. After long testing and development stages, the mission birthed a rover, Curiosity, which was launched in November 2011 and subsequently landed August 6th 2012. As we speak Curiosity is collecting invaluable data for our understanding of mars including: habitability, climate and geology, and possibly setting up a manned mission to mars in the future. The possibilities that this new information can bring are the main reason that scientist and nonscientists alike are so excited for this pivotal mission. The Curiosity project began development in 2004. Astronomers and engineers worldwide entered their instrument proposals to NASA so they could hopefully be a part of the final mission. These components were sifted thoroughly and select components were developed for four years. By 2008, they were mostly finished with the hardware and software developments and they carried on testing. This extensive testing delayed liftoff, which was originally slated for September 2009, until November 2011. NASA then administered a poll on their website to decide the name of the rover, with Curiosity ultimately winning. After naming the craft, NASA had to decide on a landing sight. It took them four meeting sessions to finally decide on a landing site for Curiosity. They ultimately selected Gale Crater as the first landing site for the Mars Science Laboratory mission. The Mars Science Laboratory launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 41 on November 26, 2011, at…...

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