Latvia

In: Social Issues

Submitted By mwilliams14
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Pages 20
Latvia: Education and Women’s Rights

Latvia is a country in the Baltic region of Northern Europe, which is bordered to the north by Estonia and to the south Lithuania. Latvia is the size of the state of West Virginia with a population of 2.3 million people, with 49% living in urban areas, 38% living in rural areas and the last 13% living in intermediate areas. Latvia has a republic political system and the lives of those living are struggling to make ends meet. Although Latvia is struggling with their depopulating state there are still many who claim Latvia as their home. Many battles are faced, many lives are lost, but through it all Latvia is still standing. Many people have faced inequalities daily, discrimination, while others suffer and have suffered by living poor lifestyles within and around the poverty line. Through it all Latvia is still standing and slowly gaining back their economic efficiency.
The age and sex distribution is very clear that women live longer than men and there are way more women in Latvia than men as well. Looking up the ratio of women to men in Latvia, I found a chart that has exactly what I was looking for. It is a chart from 2010 that has the number of women compared to the number of men by age. The age starts from 0-4 years old and goes all the way up to 80+. With this graph I noticed that there are more men in between the ages 15-29. I was a little shocked to see that there are more men than women in their early teenage to mid adulthood lives. The reason I think that it is like that is because there were more boys being born than girls in that year, but the chart still indicates that there are still more women in the older ages than men.
Latvia Population Pyramid for 2010
Age and sex distribution for the year 2010: http://www.nationmaster.com/country/lg-latvia/Age_distribution Minorities are people who are the least out…...

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