Humanists Claims That the Meaning of a Thing Is Inherent in the Thing Itself, and That Language Simply Labels What Already Exists. Poststructuralists, on the Other Hand, Argue That Naming Is Constitutive. Critically

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Humanists claims that the meaning of a thing is inherent in the thing itself, and that language simply labels what already exists. Poststructuralists, on the other hand, argue that naming is constitutive. Critically analyze these competing perspectives and the arguments that are made in support of them.

Humanism is essentially a belief system that is dictated by the way in which humans themselves, react, produce, and perform things. It is “the basic value system of humans…providing the fact that humanism is a human-centered system of meaning making”(Fuery & Mansfield, 2000; 209). In reference to the proposed argument, a humanist would see an object as a production of the human, and the language associated with that object is merely for convenience sake, to reiterate what said object is. This argument is reaffirmed by the concept of the existential self. This provides us with the view that we are separate and distinguishable from other objects and other people, which in turn suggests that whilst we interact with other humans and objects we are able to distinguish what and whom we are interacting with based on our own personal human development.

“Humanisms are based on creating a system of meaning with man as its centre.”( R.Baltmann, 1982. P174) This is of course ‘man’ in the most general sense, as a collective. In order for people to gain meaning from such individualistic societies generalisations need to be made. It is impossible for a society to create an easily understandable meaning, which fully relates to its entire people. However through creating a general meaning by which most can relate it enables others to interoperate their own meanings. This is of course the most basic human function, the creation of schemas. Schema creation in its most general sense is a cognitive short cut by which meaning is obtained without the need for complex thoughts.…...

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