History of Immigration in America

In: Historical Events

Submitted By duylamng
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History of Immigration in America Ethnic, cultural, and religious of immigrants in differences from both late nineteenth and prior to late twentieth century led to widespread assertions of the whole nation that it had made a new America. “Can We Still Afford to be a Nation of Immigration”, by David Kennedy, divides two greatest immigrants came to the United States. The author examines two historical migratory waves both in positive and negative consequences effected to the nation. America is the land of opportunities and freedom, where people come and work, seek for new better life. In either negative or positive results caused by immigrants in our economy and social culture, this country still be able to continue supporting new migrants and it will remains as the nation of immigrants. Through-out nineteenth century, mass urban and rural immigrants came from many different countries in different social culture and religious. After the first World War, population growth in Europe shipped million people out of the continent, that “population boom was the indispensable precondition for Europe to export people on the scale”. Especially by the late of this period, there were at least half of 70 millions “had left Europe” migrated to the United States. They made a huge impact to the nation and made American changed drastically and permanently. There were Italians, Jews, as well as many others from Northern and Eastern Europe. They carry with them the America Dream, in which they hoped to find a fresh start in the unknown country. Another shift of migrants was by the impact of the Industry Revolution in America. The Industrial Revolution dramatically changed every aspect of human life and lifestyles. It demanded a huge amount of labors and brings more jobs opportunities to the people, which attract new immigrants. These European immigrants came in large numbers but…...

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