Health Ethics

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By AJPierre
Words 1282
Pages 6
November 27, 2012
Health Ethics
Paper #1

Mary Pluski Case

Abortion, which is the termination of pregnancy by the removal of an embryo or fetus, has had an extensive history of controversy. The controversy has been centered on whether or not abortion should be legalized. In Mary Pluski's case, I do not think it is morally wrong for her to want to have the abortion. She wants to have the abortion, because she's not ready to have any children. She was not having sex for the pleasure of it, she was raped and that is believed to be the cause of the pregnancy. I personally feel that a women should be allowed to choose if she wants to have an abortion or if she wants to keep the baby. I believe in pro-choice, which means that a woman should have complete control of her decision to either continue with the pregnancy or terminate the pregnancy. In the Mary Pluski Case, she was raped, became pregnant and does not want to have a baby. She is not ready to take care of a baby and she does not want to bring a baby into the world while she is not ready to make that change into her life. In some cases of rape, abortion can be seen as a method to free the woman of the pain and trauma the victim may have received. For plenty women, giving birth to a child that resulted from a rape can be just as brutal as the rape itself. I believe the ethical theory my argument reflects would be Act Utilitarianism. The person that may or may not have the abortion is making a decision for a certain reason. The decision may not be a right or wrong decision, because of the outcome or consequence of the decision. We all have freedom and it is that person's decision on what they decide to do. It is their body and their life, so they should be able to decide how they want to live it. Having an abortion may be a selfish action of the mother, but it may also be to protect…...

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