Girth of a Nation

In: English and Literature

Submitted By vanna236
Words 656
Pages 3
In all roles of leadership, some form of manipulation is used. Squealer – as a spokesperson for Napoleon’s dictatorship – hosts deception as he persuades the animals into believing what he needs them to believe with the twisting of rules and regulations already in place. He doesn’t necessarily change what’s there; he simply transitions it and utilizes the animals’ slower mental tendencies for the basis of his management. What exemplifies his misleading and untruthful nature is the way he justifies a situation that is morally deemed wrong by classifying it through Napoleon’s reliable word; the way that he convinces the animals that, if it was not written, then it must be falsified by the mind; and lastly, the way he twists the animals’ thoughts into something untrue. Squealer tells a tale of Snowball’s fraud in Animal Farm and how he had been working for Jones from the very start. The animals, of course, are incredulous and stunned – Snowball, after all, had been their leader alongside Napoleon, and they had come to believe that Snowball’s intentions for Animal Farm had always been pure. Squealer uses his tactic of employing the animals’ lack of education and shortened knowledge of the alphabet and writing. As Boxer cries out that during the Battle of Cowshed, Snowball had been wounded, Squealer replies easily with, “That was part of the arrangement! Jones’s shot only grazed him. I could show you this in his own writing, if you were able to read it.” (Ch. 7, pages 72-73.) Thus being said, Squealer had diminished one sense of argument that the animals had by essentially proving his say to be the only dependable source, seeing as none of the other animals could interpret Snowball’s writing otherwise. Although this is a strong point in Squealer’s ability to persuade, it isn’t enough to thoroughly convince the others. Boxer continues to disagree, saying the he truly…...

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