Experiment 8 Limiting Reactant

In: Science

Submitted By lunahg
Words 1372
Pages 6
Limiting

Reactant

(Experiment #8)

CHM 1045L

Lucy Garcia

Misturah Abdulkareem,

Alexander Gonzalez,

Oluseun Fajimolu

Dr. Abuzar Kabir

Purpose/Abstract

The purpose of this lab was to determine the limiting reactant in a mixture of to soluble salts and the percent composition of each substance in a salt mixture.

Procedure/Method

First, we were to measure and record the mass of a beaker, then transfer about 1 gram of the salt mixture into the beaker, measure, and record the combined mass. Then, we had to fill a 400-ml beaker with deionized water and test it to make sure that the ph was just basic. We then combined the deionized water and salt by adding about 150ml of the deionized water to the salt mixture. We then stirred the combined mixture for about 2-3 minutes and then let it sit so that the precipitate would settle. After it settled, we covered the beaker with a watch glass and warmed it up on a hot plate at 75C for about 15 minutes, periodically stirring the solution. After 15 minutes, we removed the beaker from the heat and allowed the precipitate to settle again. While we waited for the precipitate to settle, we prepared wash water by heating up about 30 ml of deionized water at 70-80C. We then placed filter paper in a filter funnel to set up gravity for filtering. On the side, we took some of the solution’s supernatant and half-filled two test tubes using a pipet. Thereafter, we took the rest of the solution started filtering it with the use of a rubber policeman. IF necessary, we were to use the wash water to wash away any precipitate into the flter. After the filtering was completed, we were to remove the filter, with the precipitate on top of it, and store it away so that it was able to air-dry until the next lab class. We took two trials of this. Meanwhile, we came back to the two test tubes we…...

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