Estore Shell Canada Limited

In: Business and Management

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ESTORE AT SHELL CANADA LIMITED

Chad Saunders wrote this case under the supervision of Professors Deborah Compeau and Barbara Marcolin, and Roger Milley solely to provide material for class discussion. The authors do not intend to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a managerial situation. The authors may have disguised certain names and other identifying information to protect confidentiality.
Ivey Management Services prohibits any form of reproduction, storage or transmittal without its written permission. Reproduction of this material is not covered under authorization by any reproduction rights organization. To order copies or request permission to reproduce materials, contact Ivey Publishing, Ivey Management Services, c/o Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of
Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada, N6A 3K7; phone (519) 661-3208; fax (519) 661-3882; e-mail cases@ivey.uwo.ca.
Copyright © 2006, Ivey Management Services

Version: (A) 2007-04-30

INTRODUCTION

It was September 2003, and Calvin Wright, the commercial eProducts manager at Shell Canada (Shell), was thinking about eStore. This Web-based system was launched as a pilot in May 2002 and launched officially in September 2002. The intent was to have agricultural customers use self-serve technology to place their orders, and Shell would be able to obtain account information directly, instead of using the more costly local sales representative. Wright had spent the past year in the field working with local sales representatives and the agricultural customers of Shell’s fuels and lubricants division in an attempt to understand the low use of the online eStore. During this time, he had extensive interactions with the information technology (IT) eBusiness team at Shell Canada, led by Roger Milley. The team helped
Wright to understand the…...

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