Enron Who What Why

In: Business and Management

Submitted By tola2000
Words 722
Pages 3
ENRON CASE STUDY Title of the Article: * The first article of critique, talks about the ethical cultures and values of Enron and how this values and credence contributed to the collapse of this once corporate giants (Li, 2010). * Enron failures, the who, the how, and the why, that contributed to malpractices of its business practices (Gudikunst, 2006).
Purpose of Research:
The purpose of the first article of research is to depict the ethical views and practices of Enron’s Executives. During the Enron scandal several executives were charged with criminal acts from money laundering to insider trading and fraud (Li, 2010). This article of research shows how morals and ethical values differ in the eyes of different individuals.
Second article of research explicate, how each stakeholders in the Enron scandal played a huge role in the collapse of the once was energy giant company (Gudikunst, 2006). Dr. Gudikunst explains how each executive and external stakeholder mislead employees and vested stakeholders in believing the organization was financially buoyant in their day to day business practices, and the reasons for the misappropriation of investors capital. Final this article touches the legal aspect of accounting practices.
Research Questions
Understanding an organization’s ethical values or business core practices is the baseline in understanding any defects which took place during the Enron’s scandal. Some of the purpose research questions for the first articles are as follows 1. What are the core business values or guiding principles of Enron business model? How does this ideal play a vital role in the organizational business process? 2. How did Enron top executives view and diluted the core values of their organization business values and why?
Reporting better practices and transparency are attributes that showed major defects in…...

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