Energy Metabolism in the Canis Familiaris

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Submitted By kj4stewart
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Pages 10
Energy Metabolism of the Canis familiaris

Kristy Stewart

17153535

1. Introduction
Understanding where, and how the energy that enables life to exist comes from, known as energy metabolism (Cox and Nelson 2013), is integral to understanding health and nutrient needs for organisms. The study of energy metabolism is applicable in many areas; medicine and agricultural livestock health and production are two major applications for this discipline of study. There are different forms of energy metabolism throughout organisms on this planet, however many share the same basic cycles and functions at a metabolic rate. For example, a practically universal central pathway for the metabolism of glucose is glycolysis; the break down of glucose to attain metabolic energy to do biological work (Cox and Nelson 2013). Energy is obtained by harvesting the energy trapped in chemical bonds of food molecules (nutrients). Depending on the nutrient type an organism consumes, the energy metabolism pathways alter slightly. The major constituents of food are carbohydrates, lipids and proteins (Da Poian et al. 2010). This discussion paper will look at the energy metabolism of the Canis familiaris’ (dog) energy metabolism and regulation.

2. Diet, digestion and absorption

The dog is a carnivore and consumes a diet consisting mainly of fat and protein with a small amount of carbohydrates (Edwards et al. 2011). The digestive tract of the dog is relatively simple compared to herbivores, the stomach and small intestine are the main digestion area’s for the dog, the stomach expands to temporarily store a large amount of food to accommodate for it’s large meal sizes (Edwards et al. 2011). Nutrients (e.g. meat) is consumed via the mouth making use of the canine teeth to rip apart the flesh, this is mixed with saliva that is used as a lubricant, the food is then passed down the…...

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