Eflection on: Robert F. Williams, “Black Power, ” and the Roots of the African American Freedom Struggle

In: Historical Events

Submitted By Phoebe97
Words 375
Pages 2
I find this article very powerful, it goes into details by informing the readers what our history teachers never really told us in class. When thinking about the civil rights movements Dr Martin Luther King’s name is the only name I think about as he is revered by all. This article showed me that contrary to popular believe the civil rights movement was not all about Dr King and nonviolence. The civil rights movement did not start from the heroes whose names we all now know, it succeed because so many ordinary people like Robert Williams were feed up of the injustice and one day decided to change their lives by fighting for what they believed in. The beginning of the article that was about Robert Williams’s child hood was very heart breaking, through that little introduction of him, I was able to understand why he did most of what he did while fighting for freedom. Robert Williams was a veteran of World War II, he is a figure that most history books have left out, and he did not preach violence but was willing to use a gun in order to defend women, children, and the community. I was a bit shocked to discover that he practiced self-defense before Malcom x Besides elevating Williams to his rightful place in civil rights history alongside Malcom X and others Timothy B Tyson's article challenges the concept that Black Power and armed self-defense emerged only after 1965. Rather, Tyson points out that the roots of Black Power stretch further back and often worked "in tandem and in tension" with non-violent direct action. This is an important reconceptualization of a critical era in American history. As a matter of course, Historians have depicted the civil rights movement as a nonviolent call on the morals of America and following the Black Power as a violent disapproval of what was considered to be the right way of gaining equality and freedom, Timothy B Tyson in…...

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