Developing Countries vs Developed Countries

In: Business and Management

Submitted By sabamunawar
Words 1782
Pages 8
The emergence of developed countries as major players in global business has made it more difficult for developing countries to succeed
Contents
The emergence of developed countries as major players in global business has made it more difficult for developing countries to succeed 1 1. Introduction 1 2. Global business of Developed Countries vs. Developing Countries 1 3. Role of International Organizations 2 4. Role of NAFTA 2 5. FDI and Global Business 3 6. Conclusion 4 References 4

1. Introduction
Developing economies consist of a very diverse sort of group that includes some of large economies enjoying high economic growth rates like that of China, INDIA AND Brazil and many small economies having low rates of economic growth. The countries having high GDP growth among group of developing nations have remained able to sustain the negative impacts of financial crises very well as these were not that much affected by consequences of financial crises. There are few small or middle income economies that are quite rigid in a way that these nations depend on specific factors for development (Kose, 2013). Keeping in view the GDP growth rates of group of countries in a globe it cannot be said that developing countries do not have room for business growth but that fact is these do not have competitive advantage that can match those of developed nations and that is the reason I agree with the statement that “The emergence of developed countries as major players in global business has made it more difficult for developing countries to succeed”.

There are certain factors that are acting as hindrance in the way of business development in developing nations making their position less favorable as compared to that of developed countries in global business. One of the major factors that make position of developing nations less favorable is that of exports…...

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