Datatable Carbon Cycle

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DATA TABLES: CARBON CYCLE

LESSON 1

Lesson 1:
Step 1 Gaseous Carbon Ocean Water Fossil Fuels Biosphere Gaseous Carbon
To Year Atmosphere Ocean Surface Deep Ocean Oil and Gas Coal Soil Terrestrial Plants
2000 700 1000 38000 500 2000 1800+200 700
2050 677 1000+24 38000+17 461 1979 1800+210 732
2100 674 1000+23 38000+38 431 1962 1800+225 747

Lesson 1:
Step 2 Total Carbon Emissions Gaseous Carbon Ocean Water Fossil Fuels Biosphere Gaseous Carbon
To Year Smokestack Atmosphere Ocean Surface Deep Ocean Oil and Gas Coal Soil Terrestrial Plants
2000 6.9gt 700 1000 38000 500 2000 2000 700
2010 75 707 1031 38019 452 1974 2004 714
2020 87 737 1039 38049 369 1943 2012 724
2030 101 773 1049 38087 231 1907 2020 733
2040 117 814 1061 38133 255 1866 2029 743
2050 136 863 1074 30189 168 1818 2037 752
2060 157 919 1089 30255 66 1762 2046 763
2070 204 1002 1108 38334 0 1623 2056 775
2080 270 1118 1136 38433 0 1353 2068 792
2090 313 1247 1165 33554 0 1040 2082 811
2100 364 1395 1197 33699 0 676 2098 833

Responses to questions
1 if only half of the flora in the world existed in 2100 (perhaps due to deforestation), what do you predict the atmospheric carbon level would be? Double how would you change the simulation to reflect this? The deforestation level to 2
2 what is the relationship between increased carbon in the ocean and increased carbon in the soil? How else might carbon be transferred to soil? Soil contains water and is therefore contaminated by carbon in it. It could also be increased with decomposition of dead things.
3 Using the data generated by the simulation, determine the mathematical relationship between the percentage increase in fossil fuel consumption and the increase in atmosphere carbon. Is the relationship linear? Yes it is
4 what is the…...

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