Corporate Finance Solutions

In: Other Topics

Submitted By jrafanadorz
Words 121432
Pages 486
Contents
Chapter 1

The Corporation

1

Chapter 2

Introduction to Financial Statement Analysis

4

Chapter 3

Arbitrage and Financial Decision Making

16

Chapter 4

The Time Value of Money

26

Chapter 5

Interest Rates

50

Chapter 6

Investment Decision Rules

69

Chapter 7

Fundamentals of Capital Budgeting

89

Chapter 8

Valuing Bonds

106

Chapter 9

Valuing Stocks

123

Chapter 10

Capital Markets and the Pricing of Risk

134

Chapter 11

Optimal Portfolio Choice and the Capital Asset Pricing Model

148

Chapter 12

Estimating the Cost of Capital

166

Chapter 13

Investor Behavior and Capital Market Efficiency

175

Chapter 14

Capital Structure in a Perfect Market

184

Chapter 15

Debt and Taxes

193

Chapter 16

Financial Distress, Managerial Incentives, and Information

202

Chapter 17

Payout Policy

216

Chapter 18

Capital Budgeting and Valuation with Leverage

225

Chapter 19

Valuation and Financial Modeling: A Case Study

244

Chapter 20

Financial Options

253

Chapter 21

Option Valuation

263

Chapter 22

Real Options

274

Chapter 23

Raising Equity Capital

300

Chapter 24

Debt Financing

306

Chapter 25

Leasing

310

Chapter 26

Working Capital Management

317

Chapter 27

Short-Term Financial Planning

324

Chapter 28

Mergers and Acquisitions

331

Chapter 29

Corporate Governance

337

Chapter 30

Risk Management

340

Chapter 31

International Corporate Finance

352

©2011 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall

Chapter 1

The Corporation
1-1.

What is the most important difference between a corporation and all other organization forms?
A corporation is a legal entity separate from its owners.

1-2.

What does the phrase…...

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