Controlling Images of African Women Today

In: Social Issues

Submitted By caskew
Words 641
Pages 3
Controlling Images Today

One example that fits the definition of a “jezebel” or a “hoochie” in today’s society would be the way super star, Nicki Minaj, directly exploits herself. And in my opinion, every time she exploits herself, she is indirectly diminishing the self-respect of black women everywhere and further manipulating the distorted perspective society has already formulated for them. Since the time of slavery, African American women have been seen as hyper sexualized beings and their body shapes and physical features have continually been contrasted to white women. The idea of sex craving women with voluptuous bodies has carried on through out generations. What is shocking is that these stereotypes live and breathe within the black community, and the film, television, and music industry are persistent to keep it alive and thriving. Bad enough men take advantage and abuse the appreciation of women’s bodies through the media, but it is absolutely sickening to see a multi-million dollar icon like Minaj do it to herself and the people around her. She tries to play off this role as a powerful woman competing with some of the biggest music names out there, but she isn’t using her natural talent or business skills. Minaj excessively personifies the power of her plump backside before the power of her words., which is what she is known for. But then again how powerful can her words really be when she has a song, entitled “Stupid Hoe.” The chorus of the song is very simple and straight forward with the repetition of the phrase, “you a stupid hoe.” Not that these words from a man’s mouth should ever be acceptable, but in the line of Nicki Minaj’s work, they are almost expected from a male artist. I hate to create a double standard, but why would a woman herself want to degrade someone of her own kind but referring to them as a cheap whore? For a woman of power in…...

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