Colonists Breaking from Great Britain

In: Historical Events

Submitted By leahapplebee
Words 1424
Pages 6
One of the reasons that the colonists decided to break from Great Britain was because they believed that they were not given certain political rights that every person should be given. Another reason that the colonists decided to break from Great Britain was because they felt that Parliament was denying them of basic economic rights such as putting restrictions on trade and imposing unfair taxes upon them. Finally, another main reason that the colonists decided to break from Great Britain was because they believed that they were not being given the respect that they deserve by the people of Great Britain, especially the aristocrats and members of Parliament.

For a long period of time Great Britain did not pay much attention to their colonies in America. This was due to the fact that Great Britain was in the midst of a civil war and then later on the French and Indian war. They devoted most of their time, effort, and money into the wars so they did not have a lot of time, people, or money left to govern the colonies and keep them under their control. The distance across the Atlantic Ocean and the size of America also made it difficult for the British to control due to the amount of time it took to travel and get messages back and forth. This period of time when Great Britain did not enforce much control is known as the Period of Salutary Neglect. During this period the colonists began to learn to govern themselves. They had many economic and political freedoms that they otherwise would not have had if the British enforced control. They became used to these freedoms and that is part of what set the revolution in effect. When the British were finished fighting the wars, they were able to focus back on their control of the colonies. Since the colonists were used to economic and political freedom they had during the period of Salutary Neglect, when the British…...

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