College Physics

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SCHAUM'S OUTLINE OF

THEORY AND PROBLEMS
OF

COLLEGE PHYSICS
Ninth Edition
.

FREDERICK J. BUECHE, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor at Large University of Dayton

EUGENE HECHT, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics Adelphi University

.

SCHAUM'S OUTLINE SERIES
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