Cda R K

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By danielabella
Words 250
Pages 1
Resource Collection CS-I
(State the description of the item here from the Resource File Item List)
For this assignment, please review the Goal below and create your individual Reflective Statement of Competence.
Competency Goal/Standard I (CS-1):
To establish and maintain a safe, healthy learning environment.
Begin your Reflective Statement about this Competency Standard with a paragraph describing how your teaching practices meet this Standard. Then write at least one paragraph on each of the items below. The entire statement should be between 300 and 500 words in length.
If you are NOT currently in a child care setting or directly working with children, visualize and explain what you would do and how you would meet these standards if you were a teacher or caregiver.
CS-I-a:
Reflect on the Weekly Menu in Resource Collection RC-I-2. If you designed the menu, how does it reflect your commitment to children's nutritional needs? If you served the menu but did not design it, what are its strengths and/or what would you change?
CS-I-b:
Reflect and visualize on a classroom room environment: How does the room design reflect the way you believe young children learn best? If the room was not designed by you, what do you see as its strengths and/or what would you change?
• Additionally, for students focusing on Infant/Toddler age-group: Reflect on and describe the similarities and differences between room environments designed for infants as compared to…...

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