Case Study: Hausser Food Products Company

In: Business and Management

Submitted By czhbox888
Words 1642
Pages 7
Introduction: Hausser Food Products Company has been successful in the business of selling baby food since the 1980s, and has had extreme sales growth through the 1990s. Unfortunately, due to some outside factors like decrease in birth rates, organic and dye free standards, and private name brand competition, growth rate recently dropped by three percent. The marketing and sales team are taking responsibility for reshaping the produce line and making more sales to turn this trend around. Similarly to many large corporations, there is a sales team structure, which includes a regional manager who has district managers underneath him or her who have sales representatives in their region that report to them. The district manager, Brenda Cooper, of the East coast, is a marketing expert who obtained her MBA and has previously worked for a large business managing products and sales. She is extremely driven, and focused on solving Hausser’s sales decline issue, but is struggling to find the source of the issue and why one sales region is doing particularly better than the others. The Florida district manager Jay Boyar makes plan plus ten percent over each quarter. A researcher for Hausser’s met Cooper and was told about the interesting sales levels in Florida, so the researcher went to Florida to see what was going on. We will discuss some of the motivational factors that are causing Boyar’s sales team to excel, what Boyar is doing personally to motivate his team, and whether this is beneficial for the company as a whole. Question 1 There are different types of motivations that employees feel and obtain that help them perform better, stay with a company, and even excel and adapt in competitive environments. Kenneth Thomas wrote an article about intrinsic motivation and how it works as one of the most important factors for an…...

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