British and French Colonialism

In: Historical Events

Submitted By macguy12
Words 402
Pages 2
1. Similarities between British colonialism and French colonialism:
- They justify their colonization that they have responsibilities to civilize undeveloped countries. In reality, everybody knows that it is not their goal for colonization.
- Their goals are for economic reasons. Their colonization is all about profit they get from their colonies.
- Their ambition is also about land. France and Britain compete in who will win more lands in the world than the other. They try to possess as more lands as they can. This is obviously seen by their colonies spreading all over the world in Asia, Africa, and North America.

2. Differences between British colonialism and French colonialism:
- The British colonialism runs their colonies by giving them a kind of self-government. The French colonialism, on the other hand, doesn’t run their colonies in that way. Most of the heads of French colonies are appointed by the French government. In Vietnam, they divided the country into three parts: the North, the Central, and the South. This policy tries to break the Vietnamese unity apart so that they can easily run the country.
- The British colonialism tries to make their colonies more developed. They pour a lot of money into colonies to promote businesses, build infrastructure, and so on. Hong Kong is one of successful examples of the British colonialism. In contrast, the French colonialism is more brutal than the British colonialism. Their policy for colonization is to exploit their colonies rather than to invest them. Vietnam is one of horrible examples of the French colonialism. They try to exploit lands, raw materials, and cheap labor. They applied heavy taxes on goods and they also applied monopoly policies on salt, opium, and alcohol. These are all about the French economic and profit interests, not about their colonies.
- The British colonists started their…...

Similar Documents

The Influence of the French Revolution on British Romantic Poets

...THE INFLUENCE OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION ON BRITISH ROMANTIC POETS English Literature III Vítor Moura Introduction The French Revolution marks a turning point in world history and it is often said that it changed politics forever. Therefore, it is no surprise that its importance also reached the main literary movement of that time. Although not all of the poets were directly influenced by the Revolution, some of them were affected indirectly by the mood that ran across Europe. In this essay I will show that connection, influence and involvement between those writers and the revolutions; the one that happened in France and the one that could have happened in England. First Generation Romantic Poets First of all, it is essential to understand what the French Revolution was and why it happened. Without going into the details, we can say that it started in 1989 in an attempt to overthrow the monarchy in France and replace it with a republic. After a period of three years of tension and indecision, a republic was proclaimed in 1892 and in the following year King Louis XVI was decapitated. This was followed by the dictatorship of Robespierre and the Jacobins, the Directorate, and culminating in Napoleon Bonaparte’s dictatorship. The Revolution shook Europe all over defying order and everything old; it gave birth to new ideas that inspired European society, from music to philosophy and literature. Meanwhile, on the other side of the English Channel, the empire was......

Words: 2276 - Pages: 10

Colonialism

...opposite looking at the ideological forces that have shaped North (First World) and South (Third World) countries relations for half a century. In this essay one will be looking at the question of to what extend can the process of colonialism be blamed for the problems being experienced by developing countries today? Also matters pertaining to African migration, the spread of Islam, gold and slaves will be included in this essay as they are central to the process of colonialism. Towards the end of the last century, with a long history already behind it European colonization branched out in quite different forms according to the place and the interests of the metropolis. According to Thirlwell (1994:60) it was “a transitional period in which brutal power relations existed alongside paternalist feelings of responsibility towards natives who needed to be civilised” thus, great powers put the then dominant ideas into practice opening up the way to the so called “development” (Thirlwell, 1994). According to Rist (1997:100) “colonialism is a practice of domination, which involves the subjugation of one people to another”. The term colony comes from the Latin word colonus, meaning farmer. Thus, one believes that this root reminds us that the practice of colonialism usually involved the transfer of population to a new territory, where the arrivals lived as permanent settlers while maintaining political allegiance to their country of origin. I tend to agree with Rist (1997:105)......

Words: 2499 - Pages: 10

Colonialism and North America

...Colonialism and North America Grant Gilder Colonialism and North America In the beginning there were various settlers who colonized the area that would become known as United States of America. First there was the Asian nomads, who would become known as the American Indians. Europeans would be the next to colonize America, but this would be a few thousand years later, First there was the Spanish, followed by the French, and last but not least the British.(Muntone, 2011, p. 3) It was 1607 that the British founded the original colony in Jamestown, Virginia . It was the British intention from the beginning to colonize the Americas for the expansion of the British Empire. This new settlement in Jamestown would allow for the people of Jamestown to send back natural resources to England for the benefit of the mother country. These new colonies that began across North America were all British subjects or under control of the British. The Definition of Colonialism basically means when a country rules over a territory outside their own with citizens of the original Country. Another example would be when you create an empire by expanding into a region by dominance, both examples refer directly to the British in and how they treated the Native Americans.("Difference Between," 2011, p. 1) As the new settlers came to the new world there wasn’t much thought given to the Natives that currently lived there. Native Americans A good example of English relationships with the Native......

Words: 1589 - Pages: 7

Caribbean Colonialism

...Today the Caribbean is known as a melting pot of cultures and societies, this is mainly due to preexisting historical factors of colonialism that were done in the early 16th and 17th century in the Caribbean. The exploitation of the Caribbean landscape dates back to the Spanish conquistadors around 1600 who mined the islands for gold which they brought back to Spain. The more significant development came when Christopher Columbus wrote back to Spain that the islands were made for sugar development. The history of Caribbean agricultural dependency is closely linked with European colonialism which altered the financial potential of the region by introducing a plantation system. Much like the Spanish who enslaved indigenous Indians to work in gold mines, the seventeenth century brought a new series of oppressors in the form of the Dutch, the English, and the French. By the middle of the eighteenth century sugar was Britain's largest import which made the Caribbean that much more important as a colony. Colonialism has been regarded as a significant and common experience that has been reflected on Caribbean people of today’s culture and values, based on the events and circumstances that occurred during the 16th ,17th and 18th century . A great example of colonial influence that has been made part of the Caribbean culture is food. Everything in Caribbean culture displays this forced adaptation and the influence of several cultures mingling, from the time of slavery and the days......

Words: 811 - Pages: 4

Post-Colonialism

...Postcolonialism By Patricia Waugh Summarized by Syed Saad Mukhtar M.Phil English Literature 1st Semester The Islamia University of Bahawalpur An academic discipline and theory featuring the methods of intellectual discourse that analyze, explain and respond to legacies of colonialism and imperialism, to the human consequences of controlling a country and establishing settlers for economic exploitation of native people and their land. The term postcolonialism addresses itself to historical, political, cultural and textual branches of colonial encounter between West and Non-West dating from 16th century to present day. Postcolonialism is thus a name for a critical theoretical approach in literary and cultural studies but it also designates a politics of transformational resistance to unjust and unequal forms of political and cultural authority which extends back across 20th century and beyond. The two very different traditions of Postcolonial thinking — the theoretical Post-Structuralist and Practical Political are thus linked in so far as some of the key concepts in postcolonialism. Postcolonialism therefore refers to those theories, texts, political strategies that engage in such questioning that aim to challenge structural inequalities and bring about social justice. It is often helpful to view Postcolonialism in comparative framework alongside political practices, with which it shares key objectives and expressions: Feminism. It is possible broadly speaking to trace......

Words: 1124 - Pages: 5

Colonialism

...December 14, 2013 Shades of Colonialism The continuum of history plays an important role in human thought. History and Colonialism, to the superficial thinker, is a collection of individual actions, social change, periods, regions, civilizations and other events that are long gone. However, as Prof. Montrose points out, history is not just about the past. All that happened in the past was happening in the present at that time. We are living in our present which will be the past in the future. The history of colonialism is being written every moment that we live, and the attached articles aptly illustrate the fact. Events that molded the colonial past are interwoven in the present and are shaping the future. The commonality and diversity of causal forces and human reactions with regard to colonialism, over time is remarkable. The struggle between a dominant and suppressed culture is a common thread. The clash could be between distant cultures, such as the Europeans and Africans or somewhat similar cultures, such as the British and Irish. This can be loosely labelled as external and internal colonialism respectively. External colonialism has declined and changed character in today's world of connectivity and interdependence. Nations now do not directly or outright rule other less powerful nations. Instead, they take a more subtle approach, influencing the political class and deriving their benefits. This has even been called neo-colonialism, such as being practiced by......

Words: 1235 - Pages: 5

Colonialism

...Colonialism COM/172 University of Phoenix November 12, 2013 Kesha Eason Throughout the recent history of the last one hundred years Colonialism has proved to be in part a good thing for the world. It has shown to be at times violent with nations fighting war after war. But it also has brought numerous different cultures together. It has also helped to stop the genocide against people of different faiths and walks of life around the world. No matter how controversial Colonialism is in History it has proved to be a positive thing as a whole and it has helped to develop and modernize the world. 1. Negatives of Colonialism The roots of slavery quite often are varied and extensive, but often go hand in hand with Colonialism. What happens when a country invades and controls another nation or area, the controlled nation or area is forced to give up food, goods, and people usually by force. This has happened throughout history and it is very well written down and documented. Slavery has been used as a tool of colonialism all over the world. It is not uncommon that the people of the newly acquired territory will be forced into slavery to pay the debts of the war and to pay for the goods coming in to the country, clear out the land for the people that will surely come in, and it is a form of subjugation as a way to show the people that the new ruler reigns supreme now. It is well documented that the longest running slave trade is the Arab Slave Trade. The Arab Slave......

Words: 1804 - Pages: 8

Colonialism and Africa

...Introduction Modern African states have several problems ranging from corruption, to armed conflict, to stunted structural development. The effects of colonialism have been offered as a starting point for much of the analysis on African states, but the question of why African states are particularly dysfunctional needs to be examined, given the extent to which they have lagged behind other former European colonies in many aspects. In the first section, I will consider the problems with African states from the level of the state. That is, the nature of the states' inceptions and the underlying flaws may explain some of the issues that have been associated with African states today. Next I examine the development of, or lack of, civil society and the institutions which took place across the continent in the colonial era. In particular, I consider the lack of education and judicial authority and how this affected the formation of the structures which exist in the post-colonial era. Lastly, the economic legacy of colonialism is analysed, and whether the failure of African states to prosper can be explained by colonial practices. State Formation Ever since the boundaries of Africa were drawn up in 1884/5, very little has changed in terms of the continent's territorial divisions. Much has been made of the fact that the post-colonial states which constitute Africa were the products of colonial demarcations, and whose territories are not congruent to existing political......

Words: 1734 - Pages: 7

African Colonialism

...African colonialism During the years of 1870s and 1900s the idea of colonialism sparked. The European industrial revolution was a time that Europeans were forced to find additional resources and placement for the surplus of people that were not as fortunate as the rich capitalist in Europe. Poverty and homelessness were on the rise due to the surplus of people that couldn’t be absorbed in the system. The Europeans thought to solve the economic issue by migrating to Africa to acquire colonies and export sources, such as raw materials. The settlers set up colonies in parts South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Zambia. This led to a movement called “scramble for Africa”. Africa was divided for control of people, power, resources and goods. The “Scramble for Africa” is an example of colonialism. The European countries of Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Belgium came into Africa to try to expand their territory and exploit the African people. The new borders created during the Berlin conference would force the indigenous people to share citizenship with other ethnic groups and governments. These borders still remain. To prevent wars and conflict between the Europeans and the indigenous people, treaties were created. (Wikipedia, 2014). The Berlin conference, initiated by Otto von Bismarck, laid down ground rules for the participating countries to even out competition and decrease chances of conflict amongst themselves. After the country was divided,......

Words: 1011 - Pages: 5

Colonialism

...Typology of Colonialism Nancy Shoemaker, October 2015 In the past several years, settler colonial theory has taken over my field, Native American studies. Comparative indigenous histories focused especially on British-descended “settler colonies”—Canada, New Zealand, Australia, and the United States—have proliferated. And settler colonial theory is now dogma. At my last two conference presentations, a fellow panelist was astonished that I didn’t deploy it. My research on native New England whaling history made me more globally comparative, but it also forced a reckoning that many places experienced colonialism without an influx of foreign settlers. As scholars parse settler colonialism into its multiple manifestations, colonialism itself remains undifferentiated. One of settler colonialism’s leading theorists, Lorenzo Veracini, juxtaposes the two completely. “Colonialism and settler colonialism are not merely different, they are in some ways antithetical formations,” he wrote in the 2011 founding issue of the journal Settler Colonial Studies. For Veracini, “colonialism” apparently refers to the late 19th-century European scrambles for Africa and Asia—in popular imagery, plantation colonies where members of a white ruling class dressed in white linen lounge on the edge of a cricket field, sipping cocktails served up by dark-skinned natives. Indeed, most of the literature on colonialism explores the history of the plantation colonies of that era. Instead of casting......

Words: 1587 - Pages: 7

Settler Colonialism

...Settler Colonialism in the Middle East in the 20th and 21st Centuries ----- French Algeria Introduction: There are various kinds of colonialism such as occupation colonialism, imperial colonialism, and informal colonialism. The most common one is occupation colonialism, for example, the first wave of colonialism from late 15th century to early 19th century. No matter how differently they are called, the one thing all these colonialisms share in common is that exogenous power dominates local inhabitants. This subordination of local population could be in political, social, and even cultural ways. In these colonial relations, colonists make use of the local labor and then return home in a circular movement. Nevertheless, Settler Colonialism, described by scholar Lorenzo Veracini, is a straight line without turning pointing, a form of colonial formation that migrants remove the previous inhabitants and then take over the land they claim to form their self-ruling government.(1) Although it is called settler colonialism, it is largely different from the others. These settlers are motivated by land resource and the wealth and opportunities it could bring while natural resources such as oil, gold, fiber and human resources like labor, trade networks are more concerned resources in other forms of colonialisms, argued by scholars like Patrick Wolfe and Veracini. Besides, Settlers believe that local people should be removed from the land they claimed,......

Words: 2533 - Pages: 11

British vs. French

...Discuss the British victories from 1758 to 1760 which gave victory to Great Britain over the French in North America. What impact did this victory have on the American colonies? Great Britain and the French had ceaselessly been fighting and the British were not looking so well. It was only until 1758 that the British began to make a turn around against the French, that not only led to many victories, but also led to friendly rivalries. Although the Colonials and the British fought together and obtained their goals, a new conflict evolved, thrusting a spire of scorn between the two prior allies. Led by William Pitt the British essentially gained the upper hand on the French when they cut off their supply from the mother country to Canada via British naval forces at sea. Because the French relied heavily on goods transported at sea, they were left crippled and in a defense only mode. With this strategic gain, Pitt set out to conquer all and take over french territory by overtaking Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Louisbourg, Fort Duquesne and Quebec. Aside from the failure by Abercromby at Ticonderoga that was later redeemed, the British objectives were a success and the French were devastated. The most devastating blow was the attack on Quebec and Montreal where the British aimed “to rip the heart out of Canada.” (Millet & Maslowski 1994). Britain was successful and took over Quebec although France made great efforts to retake it in failure. Later in 1763, the Peace of......

Words: 529 - Pages: 3

Colonialism

...Political legacy of colonialism in India A lot of countries were experienced of political legacy of colonialism. This essay will focus on concept colonialism and its reasons. This notion could be defined in different ways. Colonialism is a situation of some territory which ruled by another country. Colonialism is a political-economic phenomenon whereby various European nations explored, conquered, settled, and exploited large areas of the world. Colonialism developed from imperialism, which can be reffered to as the highest stage of capitalism. In nineteenth century colonialism was motivated by a number of factors including a nation's desire for political and cultural domination and economic exploitation. One example of this period colonialism is Britain's colonization of India. Essay will explain the political legacy of colonialism based on British colonialism in India. In the long history of European colonialism, some colonists did better by their colonies that others. Many motivations pushed Europeans towards colonizing foreign lands. Primarily, nations established colonies to gain economic profits. In the early 1800's, the Industrial Revolution was beginning in such places as Great Britain, and new markets and raw materials were needed to uphold th enew industries. Nations depended on their colonies for raw materials to be used in their factories so that they could produce a growing number of manufactured goods. They then hoped to sell the manufactured goods to......

Words: 727 - Pages: 3

Colonialism

...Define Colonialism (Western) Colonialism: A political-economic phenomenon whereby various European nations explored, conquered, settled, and exploited large areas of the world. The purposes of colonialism included economic exploitation of the colony's natural resources, creation of new markets for the colonizer, and extension of the colonizer's way of life beyond its national borders. In the years 1500 – 1900 Europe colonized all of North and South America and Australia, most of Africa, and much of Asia by sending settlers to populate the land or by taking control of governments. The first colonies were established in the Western Hemisphere by the Spanish and Portuguese in the 15th – 16th centuries. The Dutch colonized Indonesia in the 16th century, and Britain colonized North America and India in the 17th – 18th centuries. Later, British settlers colonized Australia and New Zealand. Colonization of Africa only began in earnest in the 1880s, but by 1900 virtually the entire continent was controlled by Europe. The colonial era ended gradually after World War II; the only territories still governed as colonies today are small islands. http://www.answers.com/topic/colonialism#ixzz1lYMQdYfY http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonialism Colonialism is the establishment, maintenance, acquisition and expansion of colonies in one territory by people from another territory. It is a process whereby the metropole claims sovereignty over the colony, and the social structure...

Words: 2538 - Pages: 11

Colonialism in Africa

...Colonialism: The One-Armed Bandit In every essay that we have read over the past few weeks, all of the authors talk about how colonialism has ultimately destroyed Africa and their hopes of ever being as great as the other leader nations. Authors like Maria Mies, Walter Rodney, and Jerry Kloby all contribute different explanations as to how the European colonizers have basically destroyed Africa. Mies explains how Africa has no chance of “catching-up” to the other developed countries because of European colonialism. Rodney disputes the claims that colonialism has modernized Africa and how the new advancements being brought in by the colonizers were being more used against Africans than to help them. Then Kloby helps us look at real examples of different times in which colonialism has hurt Africans more than helped them. All of these authors have come to one clear consensus: colonialism has ultimately destroyed Africa’s chances of becoming a great and powerful continent. In Mies’ essay, she tends to be very pessimistic about the Africa being able to “catch-up” to other already developed countries. Mies says that, “the poverty of the underdeveloped nations is not as a result of ‘natural’ lagging behind but the direct consequence of the overdevelopment of the rich industrial countries who exploit the so-called periphery in Africa” (151). She denies that possibility that Africa can catch up by following the same path of industrialization, technological progress, and capital......

Words: 1195 - Pages: 5