Biological Bases

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By augustasia
Words 644
Pages 3
In life we all have something we strongly like or dislike no matter what it is. I have found in my life I strongly likes leading, motivating, and dedicating people which leads up to the military police or in the world being a detective. In order for this to occur I will need to be discipline and be able to follow rules. I am willing to do whatever it takes for me to be that successful person in life; therefore, I am going to stick to going to school and push myself to where I want to be in life. To be successful, I have to get that proper knowledge first.
The subfield I believe is best suited for providing psychological insight into my preference is the developmental psychology. The reasons I think this suit my situation because of the fact it states in the book "developmental psychology means studies of how people change pysically, cognitively, and socially over the entire life span (Baron and Kalsher, pg 11). The military preps you from how you used to be into the whole new person. Leading someone is a big step in life, in order to do that you need the discipline and maturity, and I feels like I am a strong person to do it. I want to be one of the best police officers to be able to save and protect people from all harm. I like the things I do in life because it involves helping others and being proud of it. I have done volunteer work, stewpot, serveds as a page for Gov. Phil Bryant, camp with JROTC, held positions in officer at school, and so on, so that should explain why I like leading, motivating, and dedicating in my life.
I feel that biological bases of behavior have contributed to my preference with sensation because I love and I am excited about my strongly like in life. The military is a good field for me, and want anything stop my dream. When I am motivating myself, I feel as if nobody is in control other than me. Perception has contributed also to…...

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