Aunt Ethel's Fancy Cookie Company

In: Business and Management

Submitted By chex185
Words 546
Pages 3
Problem 1 - Aunt Ethel's Fancy Cookie Company manufactures and sells three flavors of cookies: macaroon, sugar, and buttercream. The batch size for the cookies is limited to 1,000 cookies based on the size of the ovens and cookie molds owned by the company. Based on budgetary projections, the information listed below is available: Buttercream Macaroon Sugar
Projected sales in units 500,000 800,000 600,000
PER UNIT data:
Selling price $0.80 $0.75 $0.60
Direct materials $0.20 $0.15 $0.14
Direct labor $0.04 $0.02 $0.02 Hours per 1,000-unit batch:
Direct labor hours 2 1 1
Oven hours 1 1 1
Packaging hours 0.5 0.5 0.5
Total overhead costs and activity levels for the year are estimated as follows: Activity Overhead costs Activity levels Direct labor 2,400 hours

Oven $120,000 1,900 hours Packaging $150,000…...

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