Assess the Relationship Between Sociology and Social Policy (33 Marks)

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Social policy is the actions, plans and programmes of government bodies and agencies aim to deal with a problem or achieve a goal.e.g preventing crime and reducing poverty. Policies are often based on laws that provide the framework within which these agencies operate. Sociologists findings may sometimes influence social policies but many other factors also play a part, such as political ideologies and the availability of resources. This essay will assess the relationship between sociology and social policy.

Essentially, it can be argue that social policies are one of the most applicable ways in which sociology finds it simperative uses. This is because many sociologists argue that sociology should be used to solve sociological problems as defined by Peter Worsley “ a behaviour in which causes private misery or calls for collective action to solve it” This therefore means sociology can and should be used to investigate patterns of these behaviours and ways in which it can be resolved.

Additionally, the relationship between sociology and social policy according to Functionalists and Positivists such as Comte and Durkheim is that a rigorous objective and scientific approach should be used in order to generate social facts which can be used by the government to develop generic nomothetic patterns of behaviour that can be used to implement policies that benefit society as a whole. As highlighted, Positivists and Functionalists adopt a positive relationship between sociology and social policy.

Although, Marxists and Feminists adopt a negative, conflicting view between sociologists and social policy. As indicated by Marxists, the role of social policy is to give capitalism a “face” that appears to care for the young, poor, and elderly. It essentially masks the legitimacy of the ruling class ideology and ensures the working class are kept physically able to…...

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