A Closer Look at the Amish Society

In: Religion Topics

Submitted By delindacarver
Words 2481
Pages 10
If you ever get a chance to visit Lancaster, Pennsylvania you may be surprised at the cultural change you will witness. The Amish community came to America and settled in Lancaster. This particular community of Amish, live a life of humility, equality, obedience, modesty and simplicity. This interesting group of people may shock the common American when they compare their lives to the Amish. When comparing the cultures of the Amish versus typical American, a person will find that the family life, language, and other aspects of this population can be so different from the latter. Throughout the Amish culture, family is a main part of their lifestyle. According to Towns and Heritage, “The family is the most important social unit among the Pennsylvania Amish” (Towns & Heritage, 2013). This stems from the family’s abundance in size. It is not unusual for a typical Amish family to have seven to ten children. This growth in family is what makes the Amish community as large as it is (Towns & Heritage, 2013). In addition to having many children, the Amish also has many generations living together under the same roof. This allows a “sense of continuity and participation in family life” (Towns & Heritage, 2013). When comparing this to a typical American family, it is easy to see the difference. According to Teachman, Tedrow, and Crowder, “America is made up of a multiplicity of family types including two-parent families, one-parent families, cohabitating couples, and gay and lesbian families” (Teachman, Tedrow, & Crowder 2000). Not only is the dynamic set up of the families different from typical American families, but the number of children is different as well. As stated by Pregnant Pause in 2003, the average number of children per household in the United States is two (Pregnant Pause, 2003). Although the family system is important to the Amish, it is only one…...

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